Budget restrictions are in inevitable consequence of a recession, especially one which itself is the result of irresponsible fiscal management. Subsequently, society and its individuals are forced to endure several significant economic sanctions, which include sizeable reductions in public expenditure and also inflated levels of income and duty tax. While these are an accepted if much maligned aspect of economic recovery, there are serious questions as to how far governments should go to deliver financial stability.

This week, the governors of Michigan supported a move to close up to 70 schools in the troubled city of Detroit, with a view to halving the number of educational outlets in the region by the year 2014. This proposal is in addition to the legislation that closed 59 schools throughout 2010, and will mean that the average high school class would include an estimated 60 students by 2012. Regardless of the economic need, the question that needs to be addressed is whether this sacrifice is worth any amount of fiscal saving.

The Social Cost of Budgeting

This decision is been driven by a desperate need to reduce a vast $327 million school budget deficit, regardless of the cost to the educational well being of US students and parents. This is a government stand point, which states that there are bound to be unfavorable consequences of an economic recovery from a recession, and that the closure of schools is a necessary evil in the pursuit of financial prosperity. The issue with this assertion is that by doing whatever is necessary to secure a short term financial future, there is the potential of damage being done to the long term education of high school children.

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